Virtue and vice: or The history of Charles Careful and Harry Heedless.
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Virtue and vice: or The history of Charles Careful and Harry Heedless. Shewing the good effects of caution and prudence, and the many inconveniences that Harry Heedless experienced from his rashness and disobedience, while Master Careful became a great man only by his merit. by

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Published by by Isaiah Thomas, Jun. Sold wholesale and retail by him. in Printed at Worcester, Massachusetts .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 38968.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination61, [3] p.
Number of Pages61
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14589675M

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Virtue and vice: or The history of Charles Careful and Harry Heedless: Shewing the good effects of caution and prudence, and the many inconveniences that Harry Heedless experienced from his rashness and disobedience, while Master Careful became a great man only by his merit. Vice in its Proper Shape. Worcester: Isaiah Thomas, Virtue and Vice: or the History of Charles Careful and Harry Heedless. Worcester: Isaiah Thomas, This copy lacks title-page. Library also has second edition, ; and third edition, Wisdom in Miniature. Worcester: Isaiah Thomas, Jr., Library also has second edition, Children's books given to Mary by her father and inscribed with her name, including Virtue and Vice, Or the History of Charles Careful and Harry Heedless () and A New Version of the Psalms of David (), that are part of the American Antiquarian Society's imprint .   By then, as he realized, “the history of [these] two first Stuarts will be most agreeable to the Tories: That of the two last, to the Whigs. But we must endeavour to be above any Regard either to Whigs or Tories.” The “two last,” Charles II and James II, were of course to be considered in his next volume, one as yet hardly under way.

  A particularly striking feature of this is that, until recently, “virtue” was a term primarily associated with the right. Bill Bennett (Education Secretary under GW Bush) had a big hit with The Book of Virtues back in the s. He’s now an apologist for Trumpism.   The tragedy of Charles I was that he fell not as a consequence of vice or wickedness, but of his human flaws and misjudgments. The White King is a story for our times, of populist politicians and religious war, of manipulative media and the reshaping of nations. For Charles it ended on the scaffold, condemned as a traitor and murderer, yet lauded also as a martyr, his reign destined to sow the Reviews: I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue. In the full context we can make out how Goldwater’s speech connected his supposed “extremism” with the historical cause and disposition of the Republican Party going back to its roots. AS we are now entering upon a book in which the course of our history will oblige us to relate some matters of a more strange and surprizing kind than any which have hitherto occurred, it may not be amiss, in the prolegomenous or introductory chapter, to say something of that species of writing which is called the marvellous. To this we shall, as well for the sake of ourselves as of others.

Charles P. Pierce is a staff writer for the Boston Globe Magazine, a contributing writer for Esquire, and a frequent contributor to American Prospect and work has also appeared in the New York Times Magazine, the Los Angeles Times Magazine, The Nation, The Atlantic, and the Chicago Tribune, among other publications, and he is a regular on NPR’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me and Only. #1 New York Times bestselling author and Oscar–winning producer Brian Grazer has written a brilliantly entertaining and eye-opening exploration of curiosity and the life-changing effects it can have on every person’s life. From Academy Award–winning producer Brian Grazer, New York Times bestseller A Curious Mind offers a brilliant peek into the “curiosity conversations” that inspired. Virtue and Consent: the Twin Principles of Just Government Michael Anton The teaser for David Gordon’s reply to me—“Harry Jaffa’s disciples are rather sensitive to criticism”—represents an old, tired, disreputable rhetorical trick.   The s, known as the “hungry forties” were years of financial confusion, recession, poverty and unrest throughout much of the developed world. In the USA the boom of was followed by the “panic of ”. The United Kingdom adopted free trade, abolishing most duties & was a railway boom and bust, the Bank Charter Act of , and then a panic in